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I first came to Colombia back in 2009 and visited many times with my wife before we moved here permanently in April 2017. Now we are in 2018 and I can honestly say I have never felt like I have been in danger.
I think part of it is because I don’t “give papaya” (don’t show off expensive things and give opportunity), part of it because I just use commonsense, and really the big thing. I just don’t think it’s as dangerous in this country as the media will lead you to believe. But you can’t really blame the media, as it’s their job to sell newspapers and to get people to watch the news. And everyone knows that bad news is more entertaining than good. Not only that, but they say bad news travels 10 times further and 10 times faster than good news. So you’re the only option now to discover the real news (both good and bad) is to search online for reliable sources that aren’t influenced by big paychecks (big business).
I actually have a theory about this that you can check out on my Vlogg here.
Now to answer that exciting question… Is it safe to travel to Colombia?
YES, it is!
But it doesn’t hurt to take a few precautions, so the following 10 safety tips for traveling in Colombia are just precautions, if you don’t follow them you’ll probably still have an amazing vacation. But these are just little tips that can help minimize a bad time if someone wants to ruin your day:

  1. Don’t bring flashy jewelry, watches, etc.
    • It’s best to leave these at home.
  2. Carry a photocopy of your passport.
    • Your original passport is worth a lot of money, so it’s better to leave it somewhere safe, like in your hotel room.
  3. Use Uber or Tappsi:
    • You can download either or both of these apps to your phone. Both can work the same way with a charge to your credit card, or you can pay cash if you prefer. The great safety feature about these apps is that the driver’s details are recorded. So if he takes you on a longer trip than is needed, you can complain.
    • If you use Uber, you’ll need to jump in the front of the car alongside the driver. This is because Uber isn’t really liked by the taxis drivers that have to pay high fees for their special taxi number plates.
    • If you use Tappsi, you’ll be picked up in a normal taxi.
    • Write the address of your accommodation and intended destinations on paper. This way, even if you do not speak Spanish, a taxi will be able to take you home or wherever you want to go.
  4. Use Waze:
    • This is another app that can be downloaded and works exactly like Google maps. But because everyone uses it here, it is much better and more accurate. It’s a great idea to check your travel route prior to getting in your Uber or Tappsi, as this way you can actually direct them the way you’d like to go.
  5. Always lock the doors of your taxi or any car you’re traveling in.
    • It’s just as a precaution. But it’s always better to be safe than sorry.
  6. Just carry the money you think you’ll need for the day.
    • If you need more, you can always go back to your accommodation or get some out in an ATM. If possible only withdraw money during the day, protect your pin number, and make sure there are no loose parts on the machine.
    • Always put it in more than one pocket.
    • If you have the bad luck of someone robbing you, they want to get away as quickly as possible with no hassle. So don’t be quick to give them money from every pocket, just giving them money from one place and hopefully this will be enough and they’ll runoff.
    • Also, keep your ATM and/or credit card in another pocket.
  7. Speaking of pockets, travel pants are awesome!
    • They have deep pockets, hidden pockets, pockets with zips and pockets with velcro for extra security. I highly recommend.
  8. Don’t walk down any dark lonely streets!
    • This one is a bit of commonsense, but I thought it best to mention it just in case.
  9. Don’t leave your drink unattended:
    • Just as above, a bit of commonsense in any country.
  10. Don’t walk and talk on your cellphone in the street:
    • If you need to make a call, go into a shop or somewhere off the street.
  11. Listen to the locals:
    • These people live here and know what to do and what not to do. They know where is safe and where is not. They can tell you if an area is safe during the day and not at night; if you need to travel in a group or if it’s just not safe to go there at all.
  12. Waterproof wallet:
    • These things are a must if you’re going to the beach, spending a day on a boat, kayak or anywhere wet really. Just test it out with something other than your cell phone first. And of course, get one big enough to keep a few extra bits and pieces.
  13. Try to dress similar to the locals and blend in.
    • For example, the locals in Colombia rarely wear shorts unless at the beach, river or pool. Try to avoid an obvious tourist appearance.
  14. Check out any maps discreetly, especially if you’re using your phone!
    • If you’re unsure which direction to go in, ask for directions from a person of obvious authority, eg a security guide or police officer. It may be a good idea to have any addresses written on paper before you leave your accommodation.
  15. An experienced pickpocket can usually pick a tourist out in a crowd.
    • Wear your purse across your body with the opening flap against your stomach so that it’s more difficult to get into. If you’re carrying a daypack wear it in front, kangaroo-style.
  16. If you have the very bad luck of getting in a bad situation, just give them what they want.
    • DON’T BE A HERO; these people don’t want any problems with you or the police. They just want to get the goods (usually a cell phone) and/or cash and get out as soon as possible. So don’t argue, don’t fight, just give it to them and tell someone what has happened as soon as possible.

If you have any other tips you think would be of help to our readers, please send them through, so I can update our list and give you a shout out in my next vlog.

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